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Clearwater-Snake anglers seek donations to match TU steelhead research grant

FISHING -- Steelhead enthusiasts have until Sunday to donate and boost a juvenile steelhead research project on tributaries to the Clearwater River. The Clearwater-Snake Rivers Chapter of Trout Unlimited has received a $3,000 grant sponsored by Orvis and Trout Unlimited to study juvenile steelhead in...

Spirit Lake chinook study needs anglers’ help

Anglers in North Idaho who catch chinook in Spirit Lake can help fisheries researchers by dropping off a tissue sample at drop boxes being installed at one or more boat access points.

Study tries to boost young sturgeon in upper Columbia

Tribal and state fisheries researchers landed a big incentive this fall to continue their work on reviving white sturgeon numbers in the Columbia River upstream from Kettle Falls. A sturgeon, 9 feet long and weighing 507 pounds, was captured and released by Colville Confederated Tribes fisheries staff in September near Northport.

Landers: Redbands in upstream battle

The Spokane River, and some of its native inhabitants, were in the spotlight Tuesday and Wednesday as a wide range of scientists, policy makers and industry leaders convened for the annual Spokane River Forum. The redband trout – the river’s canary in the mineshaft – took stage at Centerplace in Spokane Valley for a couple hours among other presentations. The topics – a delicious assortment to a scientist – ranged from managing sewage overflows to setting fish consumption rates.

Landers: Redbands in upstream battle

The Spokane River, and some of its native inhabitants, were in the spotlight Tuesday and Wednesday as a wide range of scientists, policy makers and industry leaders convened for the annual Spokane River Forum.

Fish surveys not linked to liberalized limits

Some anglers were disturbed this month to read that fish biologists are using nets to survey fish populations at Lake Roosevelt. The method is used across North America and has nothing to do with the state’s current proposal to liberalize catch limits of walleye and bass in the reservoir and some other waters, said Chris Donley, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife inland fisheries manager.

Researchers track Roosevelt’s kokanee, sturgeon and walleyes

Anglers aren’t the only people stalking fish in Lake Roosevelt. Researchers have several projects under way in the 130-mile-long reservoir using radio telemetry to plot movements of kokanee, walleye and sturgeon. Walleyes have been followed as they hunker nearly 100 feet deep near the reservoir bottom during the day before rising to within 5 feet of the surface during night.