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Landers: Canoeists paddle way of Columbia salmon

Among the scientists and officials at the Lake Roosevelt Forum’s 2013 Conference this week were three young men with notably strong arms. Agency and tribal representatives convened at the Davenport Hotel to outline a variety of complicated and high-price-tag issues facing the Columbia River – fish consumption rates, contamination, water management, invasive species and climate change, to name a few.

Report addresses public safety on tribal land

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — A national panel of judicial and law enforcement experts traveled the country taking comment on public safety issues on American Indian reservations, where federal statistics show the violent crime rates can be 20 times the national average.

Court lets slaves’ descendants sue Cherokee chief

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Descendants of slaves owned by members of the Cherokee Nation can sue the current chief in an attempt to restore their tribal memberships, a federal appeals court ruled Friday. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia overturned a lower court's ruling that the case could not proceed because the tribe was not a defendant in the case and couldn't be compelled to abide by the court's ruling.

Cops knew man who killed 4 on Calif. reservation

PORTERVILLE, Calif. (AP) — Authorities on Monday were trying to determine what prompted a man to kill four family members and wound two others on a rural Indian reservation in California. Hector Celaya, 31, had had contact with police, but there was no indication that he would go on a shooting rampage on the Tule River Indian Reservation, tribal police chief Mike Blain said.

5 dead in Calif. Indian reservation shootings

PORTERVILLE, Calif. (AP) — The church bell that rings out to announce the deaths of tribal members on the Tule River Indian Reservation tolled repeatedly after a man went on a shooting rampage that left a daughter, his mother and her two brothers dead. The suspect also died in a shootout with police. Authorities cornered Hector Celaya, 31, on a country road in the middle of citrus orchards 30 miles away from the reservation and about six hours after the Saturday night shootings, that also left two of his other children wounded.

5 dead in Calif. Indian reservation shootings

PORTERVILLE, Calif. (AP) — The church bell that rings out to announce the deaths of tribal members on the Tule River Indian Reservation tolled repeatedly Sunday after a man killed his daughter, his mother and her two brothers. Authorities said the suspect also died in a shootout with police. Authorities cornered Hector Celaya, 31, on a country road in the middle of citrus orchards 30 miles away from the reservation and about six hours after the shootings Saturday night, that also left two of his other children wounded.

4 dead, 3 children injured in shootings in Calif.

PORTERVILLE, Calif. (AP) — The church bell that rings out to announce the deaths of tribal members on the Tule River Indian Reservation tolled four times Sunday after a man killed his mother and her two brothers, wounded three of his young children, then died following a shootout with police. Authorities cornered Hector Celaya, 31, on a country road in the middle of citrus orchards 30 miles away from the reservation and about six hours after the shootings Saturday night. In the car with him were two daughters, 8-year-old Alyssa and 5-year-old Linea. One had life-threatening injuries; the other did not. Police did not say which.

Spending cuts shadow Obama meeting with tribes

WASHINGTON (AP) — Native American tribal leaders are concerned that steady progress on their issues might be undermined if President Barack Obama and Congress make deep spending cuts to avoid the "fiscal cliff." More than 500 tribal leaders were taking those concerns to the fourth White House Tribal Nations summit, which convenes Wednesday. Obama is scheduled to address the group in the afternoon.

Longtime Indian activist Russell Means dies at 72

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Russell Means spent a lifetime as a modern American Indian warrior. He railed against broken treaties, fought for the return of stolen land and even took up arms against the federal government. A onetime leader of the American Indian Movement, he called national attention to the plight of impoverished tribes and often lamented the waning of Indian culture. After leaving the movement in the 1980s, the handsome, braided activist was still a cultural presence, appearing in several movies.

Russell Means, Indian activist, actor, dies at 72

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Russell Means never shunned attention. Whether leading Native Americans in railing against broken federal treaties, appearing in a Hollywood blockbuster or advocating a sovereign American Indian nation within U.S. borders, the activist who helped lead the 1973 uprising at Wounded Knee reveled in the spotlight. But it was only on his terms. Openly critical of mainstream media, the onetime leader of the American Indian Movement often refused interviews and verbally blasted journalists who showed up to cover his public appearances. Instead, he chose to speak to his fan base through YouTube videos and blog posts on his personal website.

Pope names 7 new saints, seeks to revive faith

VATICAN CITY (AP) — Some 80,000 pilgrims in flowered lei, feathered headdresses and other traditional garb flooded St. Peter's Square on Sunday as Pope Benedict XVI added seven more saints onto the roster of Catholic role models in a bid to reinvigorate the faith in parts of the world where it's lagging. Two of the new saints were Americans: Kateri Tekakwitha, the first Native American saint from the U.S., and Mother Marianne Cope, a 19th century Franciscan nun who cared for leprosy patients in Hawaii.

Court will hear Ariz. case on voter registration

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday agreed to take up an appeal from Arizona over its requirement that people prove they are American citizens before registering to vote. The justices will review a federal appeals court ruling that blocked the law in some instances.

Gov’t to allow Indians to possess eagle feathers

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department said Friday it is going to allow members of federally recognized Indian tribes to possess eagle feathers, although that's a federal crime. This is a significant religious and cultural issue for many tribes, who were consulted in advance about the policy the department announced.

Mont. Indians sue over lack of election services

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Fifteen Native Americans are suing state and county officials over a lack of election services on three Montana reservations, saying their inability to vote early or register late there is an unconstitutional denial of equal voting access. The plaintiffs on Wednesday asked a federal judge in Billings to issue an emergency order requiring the state and counties to open satellite election offices on the Crow, Northern Cheyenne and Fort Belknap reservations.

Buffalo Bill performer remembered during ceremony

MANDERSON, S.D. (AP) — Descendants of a Native American man who died more than a century ago while touring with a western-themed show gathered together Sunday to honor his life and celebrate his remains coming home to a South Dakota reservation. About 75 people gathered at a gymnasium on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to take part in a traditional Lakota funeral for Albert Afraid of Hawk, who died at the age of 20 at a Connecticut hospital in 1900. A ceremony at a nearby cemetery followed Sunday's service.

Buffalo Bill performer reburied at SD reservation

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — The remains of a man who died young while touring the world with Buffalo Bill were hidden for more than a century in an unmarked grave some 1,700 miles from his South Dakota Indian reservation. Now Albert Afraid of Hawk is returning home. He'll be reburied Sunday in accordance with Lakota tradition, thanks largely to a curious and persistent Connecticut history buff.