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Carlos Correa, Tommy Pham both win arbitration cases, players lead 3-1

In this Oct. 13, 2018, file photo, Houston Astros’ Carlos Correa, right, watches his RBI-single against the Boston Red Sox during the sixth inning in Game 1 of a baseball American League Championship Series in Boston. Houston shortstop Correa and Washington Nationals outfielder Michael A. Taylor became the first players of the year to go to salary arbitration hearings. (Elise Amendola / Associated Press)
In this Oct. 13, 2018, file photo, Houston Astros’ Carlos Correa, right, watches his RBI-single against the Boston Red Sox during the sixth inning in Game 1 of a baseball American League Championship Series in Boston. Houston shortstop Correa and Washington Nationals outfielder Michael A. Taylor became the first players of the year to go to salary arbitration hearings. (Elise Amendola / Associated Press)
Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Houston Astros shortstop Carlos Correa and Tampa Bay outfielder Tommy Pham have won their salary arbitration cases.

The decisions Tuesday gave players a 3-1 lead over teams in cases this winter.

Correa was awarded a $5 million salary, rather than the $4.25 million offered by the Astros. Arbitrators Elizabeth Neumeier, James Oldham and Gary Kendellen made the decision.

Correa made $1 million last year, when he hit .239 with 15 homers and 65 RBIs while being slowed by a bad back. He batted .315 with 24 homers and 84 RBIs in 2017, helping the Astros win their first World Series title.

Pham will get $4.1 million instead of the $3.5 million offered by the Rays. Arbitrators Margaret Brogan, Andrew Strongin and Gil Vernon ruled in Pham’s favor.

Pham hit .275 with 21 homers and 63 RBIs last year for St. Louis and Tampa Bay, which acquired him on July 31. He batted .343 with seven homers and 22 RBIs in 39 games for the Rays. He set career bests in 2017, when he hit .306 with 23 homers and 73 RBIs.

Eight players remain scheduled for hearings through Feb. 15.

Players and teams split the previous two decisions this winter: Oakland closer Blake Treinen won at $6.4 million rather than the team’s $5.6 million offer, and Washington outfielder Michael A. Taylor lost and was awarded $3.25 million instead of his $3.5 million request.

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